Teaching information literacy

Shares Guest post by Michael W. This readiness is defined as the level of prep needed for students to enroll and succeed in credit-bearing courses in college. Essentially, being college and career ready is being equipped with the skills needed to succeed outside of the K classroom.

Teaching information literacy

Conclusion There are perhaps few decisions made on behalf of students with visual impairments that are more crucial, yet subject to more confusion and controversy, than the decision regarding an appropriate reading medium.

Making an initial determination of the appropriate reading medium is not a concern for those who have no visual impairment i. Difficulties may arise, however, in making decisions for those students who are visually impaired but not totally blind.

The purpose of this article is to address these difficulties and propose guidelines for appropriate decision making. Few published procedures have been available to teachers and parents for assistance in making decisions concerning selection of a reading medium for students with visual impairments.

Perhaps the lack of attention in the literature addressing this difficult problem has led to a sense of confusion that has fueled the controversy between teaching print reading or teaching braille reading.

While common guidelines for such decisions may be used by professionals throughout the country, these have not been thoroughly documented.

In the past, professionals believed that use of vision could impair sight even further Irwin, It was common practice to blindfold, and teach braille reading to all students who were visually impaired and, therefore, "save their sight" for other tasks.

The decision to teach braille reading was made without consideration of visual functioning. Today, best professional practice and federal legislation specify that educational decisions must be made by a multidisciplinary team according to the individual needs and abilities of each student.

These decisions must be based on information obtained from systematic procedures. Such procedures must be used to determine the most appropriate reading medium for each child.

This article will focus on students who are entering a developmental reading program, i. Students with adventitious visual impairments present separate concerns that, while important, will not be considered within the scope of this paper. An essential part of this critical period is the role that professionals and parents have in assuring that a solid foundation is provided for each student.

No one can predict the future with absolute certainty.

Teaching information literacy

However, professionals and parents are called upon to make informed decisions as a team in order to assure an appropriate education for each student with a visual impairment; one essential team decision will involve the primary reading medium.

Diagnostic teaching in the decision-making process Decisions on the appropriate reading medium cannot be made on the basis of arbitrary information, such as the legal definition of blindness, since students with visual impairments use their vision with differing degrees of efficiency.

The period of reading readiness presents an ideal time for implementation of a diagnostic teaching approach, since readiness activities seek to stimulate all the senses in preparation for formal reading.

Support for the need for one reading medium or another can be derived from these data. The key element is collecting information that will provide a basis for informed decision making, a process that is undeniably superior to decisions based on arbitrary or superficial information.

Characteristics of diagnostic teaching Diagnostic teaching combines the two essential educational practices of instruction and assessment and may be characterized by the following principles: The use of diagnostic teaching practices is by no means new.

Although such an approach is typically associated with the diagnosis and remediation of learning problems, the case can be made that it has value for other applications in which a problem-solving approach is needed. The diagnostic teaching approach provides an excellent means of putting together pieces of a puzzle when one piece is missing or unknown.

The determination of the appropriate reading medium for young children with visual impairments who are beginning to read can be achieved through the use of these strategies. The process of collecting information The process of diagnostic teaching uses incidental and structured observations, indirect and direct teaching, and ongoing assessment as a basis for guiding subsequent instruction.

At this point, educators should have acquired some preliminary indication of whether a student is primarily a visual learner or primarily a tactual learner, as well as information on the rate of learning with the preferred sensory modality.I'm reading a gazillion comic books and books about comics/comic scholarship and this was a helpful, quick read.

Diane P. Wormsley and Frances Mary D'Andrea, Editors

It's a collection of essays that is well put together and addresses a variety of genres for promoting visual literacy. This article shares some ways that early Spanish and English literacy instruction are similar and different. It also explains the order in which reading skills are typically taught in Spanish and suggests activities in the classroom and at home that complement instruction.

Use these resources to supplement your curriculum and help students gain the financial literacy skills they’ll need to manage their financial resources effectively throughout their lives.

Social Media in the Classroom

*Meet Mrs. Waltke* Updated Jefferson County Schools: New Market Elementary School Literacy Lane: Jefferson County Schools Benchmark Assessment Materials.

Teaching information literacy

Teaching Information Literacy for Inquiry-Based Learning is highly beneficial to those who teach or train people and need to develop systematic ways of using information sources and tools to help them participate in inquiry based learning. Explore the five recommended practices for teaching literacy in English to English language learners: (1) Screen and monitor progress, (2) Provide reading interventions, (3) Teach vocabulary, (4) Develop academic English, and (5) Schedule peer learning.

Information literacy and the role of public libraries | Scandinavian Library Quarterly