Social concerns in the romantic period

The Romantic era is typically noted for its intense political, social, and cultural upheavals. The period is conventionally marked as beginning with the French Revolution in and ending with the passing of the Great Reform Bill inoccurrences which exemplify the political zeal of the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth centuries as well as the resultant changes brought about in society. Events initially external to England, such as the French Revolution, are internalized in Romantic literature as a part of the debates on more relevant, internal issues in English politics, such as the prededing American Revolution and the imminent Irish Uprising of

Social concerns in the romantic period

Although we now know the Romantic period as an age of poetry, the prose essay, the drama, and the novel flourished during this epoch. For much of the twentieth century scholars singled out five poets—Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Keats—and constructed a unified concept of Romanticism on the basis of their works.

Some of the best regarded poets of the time were in fact women, including Anna Barbauld, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson. Yet educated women were targets of masculine scorn, and the radical feminism of a figure like Mary Wollstonecraft remained exceptional.

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The Romantic period was shaped by a multitude of political, social, and economic changes. The early period of the French Revolution evoked enthusiastic support from English liberals and radicals alike.

But support dropped off as the Revolution took an increasingly grim course. The final defeat of the French emperor Napoleon in ushered in a period of harsh, repressive measures in England.

Wordsworth influentially located the source of a poem not in outer nature but in the psychology and emotions of the individual poet. It was held that the immediate act of composition must be spontaneous—arising from impulse and free from rules. In a related tendency, Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and later Shelley would all assume the persona of the poet-prophet.

Coleridge, by contrast, achieved wonder by the frank violation of natural laws, impressing upon readers a sense of occult powers and unknown modes of being. The pervasiveness of nature poetry in the period can be linked to the idealization of the natural scene as a site where the individual could find freedom from social laws.

Books became big business, thanks to an expanded audience and innovations in retailing. A few writers became celebrities. Although we now know the Romantic period as an age of poetry, the prose essay, the drama and the novel flourished during this epoch.

This period saw the emergence of the literary critic, with accompanying anxieties over the status of criticism as literature. The novel began to rival poetry for literary prestige. Gothic novelists delved into a premodern, prerational past as a means of exploring the nature of power.

Jane Austen, committed like Wordsworth to finding the extraordinary in the everyday, developed a new novelistic language for the mind in flux.The romantic period 1. The Romantic PeriodA time of tremendous change in Western EuropeBy Sonya Cline 2. A Time of OppositionThe Romantic Period was a time of reaction againstthe aristocratic social and political norms of the Ageof Enlightenment.

In the Romantic period, many authors make references to different social concerns. This enabled the authors to hint towards different concerns in their writing, but not come directly out and state their concerns. In the Romantic period, many authors make references to different social concerns.

This enabled the authors to hint towards different concerns in their writing, but not come directly out and state their concerns. Three great examples of authors like this include: William Blake, Robert Burns, and Anna Laetitia Barbauld.

- In the Romantic period, many authors make references to different social concerns.

Social concerns in the romantic period

This enabled the authors to hint towards different concerns in their writing, but not come directly out and state their concerns. Some of the important features of the social background of the Romantic Period () are as follows: 1.

At the beginning of the Romantic Period Britain was still largely an agrarian economy. In the last 30 years, research has shown how the era’s economic realities, social concerns, and political contests found expression in Romantic poetry, novels, drama, and other forms of writing.

Rather than emphasize the common humanity that the Romantics addressed, this contextual scholarship has explored the ways in which literature.

Politics in The Romantic Era by Kyle Decker on Prezi