A marxist criticism on the importance of being earnest by oscar wilde

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Both readings have their limits and privilege the performance either of class or of sexuality in the play. In "The Portrait of Mr.

A marxist criticism on the importance of being earnest by oscar wilde

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Both readings have their limits and privilege the performance either of class or of sexuality in the play.

In "The Portrait of Mr. But it all begins with the assumption that there are representations of gay masculinities in the play; it begins with a theory, like Wilde's narrator's project — that there was a boy actor named Willie Hughes who was the object of Shakespeare's desire.

Reflecting on this theory, the narrator reviews Shakespeare's sonnets and finds his proof in the pudding: I felt as if I had my hand upon Shakespeare's heart, and was counting each separate throb and pulse of passion. I thought of the wonderful boy-actor, and saw his face in every line" "Portrait" Later, the narrator reflects on his scholarly project and declares that "the one flaw in the theory is that it presupposes the existence of the person whose existence is the subject of dispute" In the context of Earnest, this person is the fully formed, self-identified male homosexual — a type of masculinity that was only emerging through events like the Wilde trials.

It is the argument of Alan Sinfield's book-length study, The Wilde Century, that the codes of behavior we have come to view as stereotypes of male homosexuality [End Page ] were constituted primarily through Wilde's exposure in the trials of and do not necessarily prefigure the trials.

In his introduction, Sinfield argues explicitly against reading Earnest as a play about homosexual desire although he remains sympathetic toward the impulse to provide such a reading: Many commentators assume that queerness, like murder, will out, so there must be a gay scenario lurking somewhere in the depths of The Importance of Being Earnest.

A marxist criticism on the importance of being earnest by oscar wilde

But it doesn't really work. It might be nice to think of Algernon and Jack as a gay couple, but most of their dialogue is bickering about property and women; or Bunburying as cruising for rough trade, but it is an upper-class young heiress that we see Algernon visiting, and they want to marry.

In his essay, "'Effeminacy' and 'Femininity': Sexual Politics in Wilde's Comedies," he isolates one particularly anachronistic claim that is made by Fineman and rearticulated by Craft — that Bunbury "was not only British slang for a male brothel, but is also a collection of signifiers that straightforwardly express their desire to bury in the bun" Fineman, qtd.

Sinfield's attention to this single detail of Fineman's argument may be overblown, and If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

You are not currently authenticated. View freely available titles:Written for a production of The Importance of Being Earnest at STC, in the winter of -DL I hope you enjoy my “trivial” play.

A marxist criticism on the importance of being earnest by oscar wilde

It is written by a butterfly for butterflies. - letter by Oscar Wilde to his friend Ada Leverson, In the last line of Oscar Wilde’s last and most famous play,.

Modern Drama, (Winter ) A “Revolutionary Outrage”: The Importance of Being Earnest as Social Criticism JEREMY LALONDE I propose that The Importance of Being Earnest allows for two readings: one can assume the role of the narrator of “The Portrait of Mr.

W.H.” (Wilde) or. - Satire in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest is a comedy of manners, whereby Oscar Wilde uses satire to ridicule marriage, love and the mentality of the Victorian aristocratic society. The Importance of Being Earnest Teaching Oscar Wilde's from (In The Importance of Being Earnest, Wilde portrays the false Satires cleverly disguise criticism of an intended target by clothing it in humorous language, funny characterizations, and sarcasm.

(Wilde . Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest is a witty and amusing comedy which conveys real life everyday themes such as real love as opposed to selfish love, religion, marriage, being truthful and country life as opposed to city life.

A Marxist Criticism on "The Importance of Being Earnest" Wilde’s use of binary oppositions is the. May 09,  · The Importance of Being Earnest: LITERARY CRITICISM / NOTES by Oscar Wilde Cliff Notes™, Cliffs Notes™, Cliffnotes™, Cliffsnotes™ are trademarked properties of the John Wiley Publishing Company.

Project MUSE - A "Revolutionary Outrage": The Importance of Being Earnest as Social Criticism